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Foster Brave and Smart Kids: Building Courage and Caution

The world kids live in is becoming more and more competitive and compare-based. Those who have found success or happiness are often thought to be smarter, stronger, or possessed of extraordinary abilities only available to a select few. It is easy for them and all of us to feel this way. However, no matter what we think, this statement is not valid. No one is born with the “success gene” or the “happiness gene.” Caregivers at an Olney child care center know that being brave is one of the most important things to help you succeed and be happy.

What is Courage?

When seen from the outside, courage often looks strong, sure of itself, and striking. It might look dangerous or exciting at times. But from the inside, it can be scary and difficult to plan for. It might feel like stress, fear, or a lot of self-doubt. Courage is sneaky like that—how you think it feels on the inside doesn’t always match how it looks on the outside. This is because fear and bravery are always present. There is no other way for it to be. There is no need to be brave if there is no fear.

Bravery isn’t the absence of fear, instead its a magical inner force that propels us to tackle tough, frightening, or daunting challenges despite our fears. Often, all it takes is a few seconds of courage to make a difference.

Another thing kids should know about bravery is that it doesn’t always show itself right away. Someone with courage might be nice to the new kid in class, try something new, or stand up for what they believe in. People who work in child care in Olney, MD, know that often, these events don’t have explosions or cheers. It may take some time for the changes they make to become apparent, but when people act bravely, those changes will always be there, slowly taking shape and making their very important parts of the world different somehow.

How Do You Develop Courage in Children?

One of the best ways to develop courage in children is to give them a chance to do physically challenging things that might be out of their comfort zone. For example, let them participate in contests, events, sports, and other adventurous activities. You should really know your child and what makes them strong and weak so that you can help them see where they need to be brave. If your child has trouble making friends, you can encourage them to be courageous by taking them to a new camp or activity where they won’t know anyone.

Father And Son Having Fun Piggy Back Outdoors.

Parents should encourage their kids to be successful by giving them chances to do things that are outside of their comfort zone but still within their reach. It’s also important to praise kids when they try something new or challenging and understand how hard it was and how they got through it. We can show our kids how brave and strong they can be when they are put to the test by celebrating when we get through hard times with them.

Teach Them to Be Confident

Give your kids the confidence they deserve. Assist them in realizing that their essence is not found in their actions, the opinions of others, or the accumulation of material belongings. They may walk with confidence when they know who they are. Their self-assurance will give them the bravery to be authentic and take chances in relationships.

Celebrate Courage

Establish a weekly family ritual where everyone discusses something brave they did this week, perhaps at the dinner table. This is your chance to demonstrate to them that bravery can take many different forms and that even grownups can experience moments of weakness. This prepares them to take chances and accomplish things they might not have otherwise, even if it’s so that they can tell you about it.

Courage is About Doing the Right Thing

Courage can sometimes be defined as doing the right thing and other times as doing the scary thing. Assume that a group of pals are planning to see a terrifying film. Children sometimes assume that being brave means watching a movie, but being brave means saying “no” when something seems wrong. One of the boldest things any human can do is to say “no” to something that doesn’t seem right.

The first stage is to determine if anything is right or wrong. The tricky part comes next: figuring out a safe way out. Saying “no” is not always straightforward, so bravery is needed in situations like this. Offer them a few options to consider. These could include walking away, offering an alternative activity, placing the blame on a parent, or cracking a joke.

Show Them What Courage Is

You must be brave if you want your kids to be brave. Show them that you can get out of your safe zone. Face your fears and ride that scary ride at the park if you’re scared of rollercoasters. You might be afraid that moving will make you look stupid. Go to dance class with your wife to show you’re wrong. You should show your kids how strong you are to do the right thing when your character is put to the test. Every day, we are tried in a vast range of ways. Be the hero of your kids.

Brave young girl in helmet climbs on tree tops in amusement rope park.

Challenge Your Kids

Of course, we always want to keep our kids safe. However, we must constantly push them to try new things and do things they might be afraid of. For example, when you try new food, talk in front of the class, or play a sport, give them lots of love and praise when they do these things. Build on the brave things they did.

Final Thoughts

Kids might think that heroic deeds or slaying monsters define courage, but those who work with kids at a daycare in Olney, MD, know differently. The truth is that every day, our kids defeat and slay their own dragons. Every one of them are heroes. Helping them understand this is important so they can push through their edges when they feel weak, scared, confused, or not seen. Realizing that bravery is always inside you, waiting to help when you need it, even if you don’t feel brave, is key to being courageous.Top of FormBottom of Form

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